Bergamot – Beyond The Name

Bergamot oil is extracted from the fruit of the bergamot tree, which is grown in Italy, Morocco and Corsica. According to “The Aromatherapy Bible,” by Gill Farrer-Halls, the oil is taken from the peel of the fruit when it is nearly ripe. Bergamot oil has a citrus aroma and is used in aromatherapy. Many holistic practitioners also believe that it has medicinal benefits. Consult with a physician before ingesting bergamot or applying it to the skin.

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Emotional Benefits

Bergamot oil is commonly used in the practice of aromatherapy. Its citrus scent is believed to have an uplifting effect. Therefore, it is often used as a natural way to treat emotional disorders such as depression, stress, nervous disorders and anxiety. Bergamot oil can be blended with other essential oils and is complimented by other citrus oils, such as lemon and grapefruit. It can also be mixed with floral scents such as rose and geranium. Bergamot oil, and aromatherapy blends containing bergamot oil, are available for purchase online, at some health food stores and at many metaphysical and specialty stores. You may experience the emotional benefits of bergamot oil by using a few drops of the oil in a bath or aromatherapy diffuser, wearing the scent as a perfume or by enjoying a massage with an oil that contains bergamot. According to “The Aromatherapy Bible,” no more than three drops of the oil should be used in a bath.

Skin Benefits

There are believed to be many skin benefits associated with the use of bergamot oil. According to “The Aromatherapy Bible,” bergamot is believed to have antiseptic properties. For this reason, it is often added to creams and lotions that are used to treat oily skin and acne. Bergamot oil is also thought to have deodorant properties, and may be used in place of commercial deodorizers that may contain aluminum. Creams, lotions and massage oils containing bergamot oil can be purchased online as well as at local specialty skin care and aromatherapy shops.

Alright, check out our reference links now…

  1. Bergamot Oil by Drugs
  2. Bergamot Oil by ehow
  3. Benefits Of Bergamot by Blog

Expanded Description Of Bergamot Oil

Certain oils require certain bigger and better descriptions. Bergamot just being one of them.

The oil smells of fresh citrus, and is pale gold in color. People should be cautious when using this oil on the skin, because it tends to increase photosensitivity, and the skin may be damaged if it is exposed to excessive light.

Bergamot is an aromatic oil found in the peels of the fruit of the bergamot orange, a citrus tree which flourishes in Italy. The oil is used in essential oil preparations, skin care products, and as a food flavoring, most notably in Earl Gray tea. The flavor is floral and rich, with a faintly bitter or astringent flavor.

The bergamot orange, also known as Citrus bergamia, is native to Southern Asia, but was introduced to Italy, where it flourished. Attempts to cultivate it in other regions have not been nearly so successful, with Italian oranges producing the bulk of that which is commercially used. The peels of the oranges were dried and added to early flavored teas, and essence of bergamot was also extensively used in perfumes. The mild citrus scent and flavor are quite appealing to some consumers, leading to enduring demand for the orange.

As an essential oil, bergamot is believed to be uplifting and energizing. It is often included in essential oil mixtures which are designed to reduce stress, energize, and treat depression. It can be included in incense, used in an essential oil diffuser, or added to baths, in moderation. The oil is also included in skin care products, and like other citrus oils, it is faintly astringent and toning. Pure oil can be harsh on the skin, and it should always be diluted before being applied. Talking about its use, internally…

  • Bergamot is used medicinally to relieve symptoms of colds and chest or throat complaints, and for mild digestive complaints.
  • Native American Indians made an herb tea from bergamot leaves for this purpose.

Also, external use

  • The leaves are used in fruit drinks and the petals for decorating salads.
  • Bergamot leaves and petals (dried or fresh) are added to hot water for a revitalizing and perfumed bath.

Alright, have a look at our reference links now…

  1. Bergamot by Wise Geek
  2. Bergamot Essential Oil by Aroma Blog
  3. Bergamot by OF

Bergamot Super Oil

Bergamot essential oil is one wonderful solution for every minor major problem. This oil is medically sound. I had an uncle of mine, who suggested this to me, he has this certain medicinal connect. I tried, personally, and it was so effective.

It may be that Bergamot directly influences the appetite-control centre in the brain, or that, by working with the underlying tensions that have provoked the under- or over-eating, it enables the sufferer to return to a normal weight and eating pattern. Perhaps it should be pointed out that this is not an overnight ‘cure’, but a process that involves great sensitivity on the part of the therapist, and a will to get better on the part of the person seeking help.

The antiseptic properties of Bergamot, allied to its really delicious fragrance, make it my first choice for treating acne, oily skins and all infected skin conditions. It can be used in a massage oil for -

  • Facial treatment
  • Blended in creams
  • Lotions
  • Aromatic waters

A hot compress of Bergamot can be used on boils to draw out the infection and promote healing, though a person with boils should also be advised on dietary and other ways of eliminating toxins. It should be emphasised that Bergamot must never be used undiluted, as it can cause skin irritation (though a few drops on the wrist as a perfume will be harmless).

Bergamot increases the skin’s sensitivity to sunlight, so making it tan faster, and there is some suggestion that it may increase the risk of skin cancer. Do not use Bergamot in massage oils, bath oils or skin preparations during sunny weather. Never use Bergamot undiluted on exposed areas of skin, as quite severe burning can result. This photosensitising effect lasts for several days after application. The same caution applies to eau de cologne, lavender water and other commercial perfumes and toiletries which contain Bergamot oil. Bergamot does not protect the skin against burning.

Bergamot is cooling in feverish conditions. It is an ingredient of Earl Grey tea, and of ‘real’ eau de cologne (as mentioned in the last paragraph), both of which have a cooling and uplifting effect. It is an excellent deodorant, both for personal use and for rooms and buildings. It is also an effective insect repellent, and is used commercially for this purpose.

Have a look at our reference links -

  1. Bergamot Essential Oil by Aroma Blog
  2. Bergamot Oil by WG
  3. Bergamot by Home Remedies

The Many Benefits Bergamot Essential Oil

Bergamot essential oil is one amazing natural oil that has been long known to efefctively deal with ceratin kinds of fevers and internal problems. The oil is really strong yet harmless. Everyone who uses the oil just has good things top say about it.

The oil is obtained by simple pressure from the rind of the fruit, and although various attempts to mechanise the process have been tried, the best oil is still that which is hand-pressed. As you might expect, it has a delightfully fresh, citrussy aroma, which is almost universally liked. The active constituents include -

  • Linalyl acetate
  • Limonene
  • Linalol

And the essential oil is of a delicate green colour.

The three main areas in which this oil is uniquely valuable are: urinary tract infection, depression and anxiety, and skin care. Bergamot oil has a strong affinity for the urino-genital tract, and is one of the most valuable oils (along with Camomile and Garlic) in treating cystitis and urethritis. Many cases of cystitis begin as urethritis, and the infection travels up the urethra to the bladder. Bergamot oil, used in the very early stages, can often prevent the infection from spreading upwards in this way.

It should be added to the bath, and used as a local wash (very diluted-to ‘/2% or 1%). As a local wash, it is also valuable for the relief of vaginal pruritis and mild discharges (though it is important to ensure that the cause of any discharge is investigated). If an attack of cystitis does not respond to treatment, particularly if there is fever, medical help should be sought without delay. Bergamot is especially valuable to people who suffer from recurrent attacks of cystitis, as it is a powerful disinfectant of the urinary system.

Many people with recurrent cystitis are also tense, anxious or depressed, and this can become a vicious circle, in which the tension sparks off an attack, and the lowering effects of the illness lead to even greater depression. Although Camomile and Garlic are both valuable for the physical treatment of this debilitating condition, there is nothing better than Bergamot to break this chain reaction, by relieving the tension and depression, whilst actively treating the physical causes. In helping with mental and psychological stales, Bergamot is almost the most valuable oil at the aromatherapist’s disposal. It has been described by Robert Tisserand as ‘uplifting’ and you cannot improve on this description.

Go through our reference links now -

  1. Bergamot Essential Oil by Aroma Blog
  2. Bergamot Oil by WG
  3. Bergamot by Home Remedies

Fighting All Ills – Bergamot Essential Oil

Bergamot essential oil is one traditional favourite oil that does magic whenever it comes in contact with the human skin and in some cases, even the skin of certain favourite animals and all this being  possible only due to its various amazing properties…

Bergamot is cold pressed from the fruit peel and is imported from Italy…

Bergamot is a pleasant winter oil and is believed to encourage sleep, help in digestion and reduces stress

Bergamot has a delicious fresh and invigorating citrus fragrance and is both refreshing and relaxing. It is ideal for confidence building and also provides for a restful sleep…

The herb helps to fight depression, is a proven Antiseptic and is Antispasmodic…

From curing minor ailments like Loss of Appetite, Colds, Mouth Infections, Cold Sores, Acne, Boils, Nervousness, nasal decongestion, Flatulence and Sore Throat, the herb is useful in treating major ailments like -

  • Abscess
  • Chicken Pox
  • Cystitis

Bergamot can be used also to disinfect air, a delightful room freshener when mixed with Geranium and Lavender…

This can safely be used in a combination with Chamomile, Geranium and Lavender

A harmonizing blend of Bergamot, Lavender and Geranium creates a sense of well being by lifting melancholy, relieving anxiety and stress, and balancing emotional extremes. This blend can be beneficial for premenstrual syndrome.

A lotion consisting of 3 drops Bergamot with 4 drops of Lavender, 2 drops Peppermint, 2 drops Basil, and 1 drop Neroli (or Chamomile) tea in a small amber bottle with a carrier of 1 T. vegetable oil or unscented lotion added to it is very effective for digestion. Use this lotion 1/2 hour before meals by applying to the stomach and back of hands. Use sparingly, as this is a concentrated blend.

Topically, some use bergamot oil to treat the flaky skin and patchiness associated with acne, eczema, psoriasis and vitiligo. Bergamot oil decreases sun sensitivity, making it a common ingredient in tanning lotions to speed the tanning process.

This psoralen photodermatotoxicity or light-induced toxic injury to the skin, also increases the chance of sunburn, so  topical application of it is discouraged. While it is suggested do not use bergamot externally if you have very sensitive skin. I even suggest finding furcumarin-free bergamot oil since this substance in bergamot oil appears to cause these reactions.

Alright, go through our references now…

  1. Bergamot Essential Oil by Wise Geek
  2. Bergamot Oil by thearomablog.com
  3. Bergamot Essential Oil by Organic Facts