Bergamot – Beyond The Name

Bergamot oil is extracted from the fruit of the bergamot tree, which is grown in Italy, Morocco and Corsica. According to “The Aromatherapy Bible,” by Gill Farrer-Halls, the oil is taken from the peel of the fruit when it is nearly ripe. Bergamot oil has a citrus aroma and is used in aromatherapy. Many holistic practitioners also believe that it has medicinal benefits. Consult with a physician before ingesting bergamot or applying it to the skin.

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Emotional Benefits

Bergamot oil is commonly used in the practice of aromatherapy. Its citrus scent is believed to have an uplifting effect. Therefore, it is often used as a natural way to treat emotional disorders such as depression, stress, nervous disorders and anxiety. Bergamot oil can be blended with other essential oils and is complimented by other citrus oils, such as lemon and grapefruit. It can also be mixed with floral scents such as rose and geranium. Bergamot oil, and aromatherapy blends containing bergamot oil, are available for purchase online, at some health food stores and at many metaphysical and specialty stores. You may experience the emotional benefits of bergamot oil by using a few drops of the oil in a bath or aromatherapy diffuser, wearing the scent as a perfume or by enjoying a massage with an oil that contains bergamot. According to “The Aromatherapy Bible,” no more than three drops of the oil should be used in a bath.

Skin Benefits

There are believed to be many skin benefits associated with the use of bergamot oil. According to “The Aromatherapy Bible,” bergamot is believed to have antiseptic properties. For this reason, it is often added to creams and lotions that are used to treat oily skin and acne. Bergamot oil is also thought to have deodorant properties, and may be used in place of commercial deodorizers that may contain aluminum. Creams, lotions and massage oils containing bergamot oil can be purchased online as well as at local specialty skin care and aromatherapy shops.

Alright, check out our reference links now…

  1. Bergamot Oil by Drugs
  2. Bergamot Oil by ehow
  3. Benefits Of Bergamot by Blog

Bergamot Essential Oil Fighting Woes

Bergamot essential oil is actually one of the many sacred oils that were used initially by our ancestors who were already aware of the ebenfits of this oil. In certain parts of the world, the oil is actually worshipped.

This light, fruity citrus oil is uplifting, antiseptic, and relaxing. Relaxes and refreshes and is good for confidence building. Uplifts the spirit and emotions with its fresh and invigorating citrus fragrance. Useful for caring for oily and blemished skin. Use in vaporiser to disperse unpleasant odours.

It is familiar to many as the flavouring in Earl Grey Tea. Also works well on the digestive tract and relieves conditions such as painful digestion, dyspepsia, flatulence, colic, indigestion and loss of appetite. An excellent intestinal antiseptic, casts out intestinal parasites and diminishes gall stones apparently.

May be useful to anorexia sufferers by regulating appetite. Also helpful with infections of the respiratory system which may include breathing difficulties as well as -

  • Tonsillitis
  • Bronchitis
  • Tuberculosis

Often effective on cold sores, chicken pox and shingles. Could have a tonic action on the uterus and was once used to heal sexually transmitted diseases. Excellent insect repellent and keeps pets away from plants. Skin type -

  • Oily
  • Blemished
  • Normal
  • Combination

For all tense, anxious or depressed people, Bergamot should be used in a massage oil (either alone or in a variety of blends) as the human contact with the therapist is perhaps the most important factor in such situations; but daily use as a bath oil, room fragrance or personal perfume can be very valuable additions to I the treatment. The fragrance is equally acceptable to men and women, and it blends with almost any flower oil, giving it considerable versatility. Lavender/Bergamot, Geranium/ Bergamot or all three of these oils together, are among some of the most pleasing combinations. It is particularly valuable for adding a sharper note to some of those oils which may be over-sweet to some people’s tastes.

Dr Jean Valnet mentions the use of Bergamot for loss of appetite, and this, combined with its powerful antidepressant properties, would seem to indicate a valuable possibility for helping in anorexia nervosa. However, my own experience suggests that its effect on the appetite is regulating rather than stimulant, and I have used it to help compulsive eaters.

Have a look at our reference links now -

  1. Bergamot Essential Oil by Aroma Blog
  2. Bergamot Oil by WG
  3. Bergamot by Home Remedies

Bergamot Oil – Healing Woes

Beragmot oil has an amazing fruity smell and as far as the use of it is concerned then it is a favourite of natural therapists all over the world because of its various healing and curing natural properties.

Bergamot is a citrus fruit whose rind is used for extracting the Bergamot Oil. The scientific name of Bergamot is Citrus Aurantium var. or Citrus Bergamia. It is a tropical plant but thrives well in Europe too. The chemical composition of Bergamot Oil includes Alpha Pinene, Alpha Bergaptnen, Alpha Terpineol, Limonene, Linalool, Linalyl Acetate, Nerol, Neryl Acetate, Beta Bisabolene, Geraniol, Geraniol Acetate and Myrcene.

The scent of the oil is basically citrus, yet fruity and sweet, with a warm spicy floral quality and is reminiscent of neroli as well as lavender oil. The color ranges from green to greenish-yellow and the oil has a watery viscosity.

This tree is native to South East Asia, but was introduced to Europe, and particularly Italy and is also found in the Ivory Coast, Morocco, Tunisia and Algeria.

Bergamot oil is made from a tree that can grow up to four meters high, with star-shaped flowers and smooth leaves, bearing citrus fruit resembling a cross between an orange and a grapefruit, but in a pear-shape. The fruit ripens from green to yellow.

The oil is one of the most widely used in the perfumery and toiletry industry and forms, together with neroli and lavender, the main ingredient for the classical 4711 Eau-de-cologne fragrance. It is used to flavor Earl Grey tea.

The therapeutic properties of bergamot oil include –

  • Analgesic
  • Antidepressant
  • Antiseptic
  • Antibiotic
  • Anti-spasmodic
  • Stomachic
  • Calmative
  • Cicatrisant
  • Deodorant
  • Digestive
  • Febrifuge
  • Vermifuge
  • Vulnerary

When you are looking for an oil to help with depression, SAD (Seasonal Affected Disorder) or generally feeling just a bit off, lacking in self-confidence or feeling shy, then consider bergamot oil. It also has superb antiseptic qualities that are useful for skin complaints, such as acne, oily skin conditions, eczema and psoriasis and can also be used on cold sores, chicken pox and wounds.

It has a powerful effect on stimulating the liver, stomach and spleen and has a superb antiseptic effect on urinary tract infections and inflammations such as cystitis.

Alright, have a look at our reference links now –

  1. Bergamot Essential Oil by livestrong.com
  2. Bergamot by Foods
  3. Bergamot by Acne

 

The Works And Works Of Bergamot Oil

Bergamot essential oil is a pretty old medicinal and therapeutic oil, which has always had the reputation of an amazing healing liquid and has been used extensively by our ancestors of various kinds of diseases…

Bergamot has a rather controversial history. Some say it originates from Northern Italy, taking its name from the the small town of Bergamo where it was discovered. Others state it originated in India, and its Turkish name means “King of Pears”, which reflects the pear- shaped fruit of the plant. Whatever its history, there is no disputing that bergamot has been used for years because of its sweet, citrusy scent with spicy undertones. Popular with perfumers for centuries, bergamot has an uplifting, energizing scent which also makes it perfect for aromatherapy. Additionally, bergamot is one of the most versatile essential oils, as not only does it have sedative qualities, but also stimulating as well. It appears to adapt to the needs of the person using it. Bergamot also gives Earl Grey tea its unmistakable and unique flavor, which makes it a favorite among tea lovers everywhere

Deals efficiently with everything, the main of the lost being –

  • Acne
  • Appetite regularity
  • Anxiety
  • Colds and flu
  • Cystitis
  • Depression
  • Digestive system
  • Eczema
  • Fatigue
  • Fever
  • Flatulence
  • Halitosis
  • Infection (all types, especially skin)
  • Mouth infections
  • Nervous tension
  • Sore throat
  • Stress
  • Tonsillitis
  • Urinary tract

For acne, eczema, psoriasis, and wounds, mix 2-3 drops with jojoba , carrier oil and apply directly to affected area.

To alleviate anxiety, depression, fatigue, nervous tension, and stress use 2-3 drops of essential oil in a diffuser or a lamp ring.

For cystitis and urinary tract health, use 4-5 drops in bath water for a I luxurious, long soak. Also, 2-3 drops of bergamot can be added to a carrier oil and massaged over the lower abdomen and kidney area to promote optimal health of the excretory system.

For digestive help and flatulence, use 2-3 drops in a carrier oil and massage over abdomen area. Can also use 2-3 drops in a diffuser.For halitosis, mouth infections, sore throat, or tonsillitis, use 2-3 drops in a homemade mouthwash. Gargle and rinse.

To regulate appetite, use 2-3 drops in a diffuser regularly.

Go through our reference links now…

  1. Bergamot Oil by Wise Geek
  2. Bergamot Essential Oil by Aroma
  3. Bergamot Essential Oil by Organic Facts

Fighting All Ills – Bergamot Essential Oil

Bergamot essential oil is one traditional favourite oil that does magic whenever it comes in contact with the human skin and in some cases, even the skin of certain favourite animals and all this being  possible only due to its various amazing properties…

Bergamot is cold pressed from the fruit peel and is imported from Italy…

Bergamot is a pleasant winter oil and is believed to encourage sleep, help in digestion and reduces stress

Bergamot has a delicious fresh and invigorating citrus fragrance and is both refreshing and relaxing. It is ideal for confidence building and also provides for a restful sleep…

The herb helps to fight depression, is a proven Antiseptic and is Antispasmodic…

From curing minor ailments like Loss of Appetite, Colds, Mouth Infections, Cold Sores, Acne, Boils, Nervousness, nasal decongestion, Flatulence and Sore Throat, the herb is useful in treating major ailments like -

  • Abscess
  • Chicken Pox
  • Cystitis

Bergamot can be used also to disinfect air, a delightful room freshener when mixed with Geranium and Lavender…

This can safely be used in a combination with Chamomile, Geranium and Lavender

A harmonizing blend of Bergamot, Lavender and Geranium creates a sense of well being by lifting melancholy, relieving anxiety and stress, and balancing emotional extremes. This blend can be beneficial for premenstrual syndrome.

A lotion consisting of 3 drops Bergamot with 4 drops of Lavender, 2 drops Peppermint, 2 drops Basil, and 1 drop Neroli (or Chamomile) tea in a small amber bottle with a carrier of 1 T. vegetable oil or unscented lotion added to it is very effective for digestion. Use this lotion 1/2 hour before meals by applying to the stomach and back of hands. Use sparingly, as this is a concentrated blend.

Topically, some use bergamot oil to treat the flaky skin and patchiness associated with acne, eczema, psoriasis and vitiligo. Bergamot oil decreases sun sensitivity, making it a common ingredient in tanning lotions to speed the tanning process.

This psoralen photodermatotoxicity or light-induced toxic injury to the skin, also increases the chance of sunburn, so  topical application of it is discouraged. While it is suggested do not use bergamot externally if you have very sensitive skin. I even suggest finding furcumarin-free bergamot oil since this substance in bergamot oil appears to cause these reactions.

Alright, go through our references now…

  1. Bergamot Essential Oil by Wise Geek
  2. Bergamot Oil by thearomablog.com
  3. Bergamot Essential Oil by Organic Facts

King Of ‘Anti’ – Bergamot Essential Oil

Bergamot oil, as has been proven, is the best essential oil that fights infections and bacteria and is the most effective in dealing with all the problems relating to it…

Research studies have also shown Bergamot essential oil to effectively balance the activity of the hypothalamus gland, seat of your more intense emotions such as terror and rage. The hypothalamus gland works in synchrony with the pineal and pituitary gland to help regulate and balance your hormonal cycles, including your natural sleep and wake cycles and excellent for relieving symptoms of jet lag.

Bergamot is a fever reducer, boosts the immune function and is good for morale and self esteem issues and helps to rebuild strength and regain self confidence.

Bergamot cleanses and freshens. Often used as a breath freshener. Try it in your aroma diffuser to brighten a stale or smoke filled room.Add 30+ drops of Bergamot and 30+ drops of Lemon or Lemongrass Essential oil to a 2 ounce (colored glass) misting bottle of pure water. Shake and mist.

Bergamot aids return of appetite, and has been recommended for quitting smoking and is traditionally used as a flavoring in Earl Grey tea!

Here are the topmost actions of it…

  • Antidepressant – alleviates or prevents depression, lifts mood, counters melancholia, reduces anxiety
  • Anti-inflammatory – controls, alleviates inflammation resulting from injury or infection
  • Antifungal – destroys or inhibits growth of fungus
  • Antimicrobial – an agent that resists or destroys pathogenic microbes (virus and bacteria).
  • Antiparasitic – destroys, or inhibits parasites.
  • Antiseptic – prevents, halts infection (mouth throat gargles).
  • Antispasmodic – calms nervous and muscular spasms, for colic, pain and indigestion
  • Astringent – causes contraction of organic tissues
  • Calming & Sedative – Insomnia
  • Disinfectant – prevents and combats spread of germs
  • Diuretic – promotes formation urine, aids flushing body toxins, breaking down fats
  • Expectorant – helps promote the removal of mucus from respiratory system
  • Halitosis – offensive breath
  • Regulator – an agent that helps balance and regulate the functions of the body.
  • Relaxant – soothing, causing relaxation, relieving strain or tension.
  • Stimulant – an agent that quickens the physiological functions of the body, temporarily increases body or organ function, good for convalescence, poor circulation, listlessness, physical fatigue
  • Tonic – digestive, Central Nervous System (CNS)

Check out our reference links now…

  1. Bergamot Essential Oil by livestrong.com
  2. Bergamot by Foods
  3. Bergamot by Acne

Ancient Oil Bergamot Essential

If you think that the explorers conjured up Bergamot oil just like that, then you are absolutely mistaken, because this is one oil that has been equally extensively used in the ancient times as it is being used today….

Since ancient times, bergamot has been an essential oil of many uses. Did you know that the signature flavor in Earl Grey Tea is the bergamot orange?

The bergamot orange (Citrus aurantium ssp. bergamia) is a small, extremely aromatic and roughly pear-shaped citrus fruit originating in Calabria, Italy.  It is a cross between the pear lemon and the Seville orange or grapefruit (not to be confused with Monarda didyma, which is an unrelated herb/wildflower that bears the same name).

It is the fresh, sweet, citrus scent of bergamot (Citrus bergamia) that is familiar to many as the flavoring in Earl Grey Tea.  An essence extracted from the aromatic skin of the sour bergamot fruit is used to flavor Earl Grey tea and many other food items such as –

  • Confectionery
  • Marmalade
  • Preserves

The essential oil is pressed from the rind or peel of bergamot.  It is rectified and void of terpenes.

Bergamot peel is used in perfumery for its ability to combine with an array of scents to form a bouquet of aromas which complement each other. Approximately one third of all men’s and about half of women’s perfumes contain bergamot essential oil. Bergamot was a component of the original Eau de Cologne developed in 17th century Germany – in 1704 the bergamot was first used to make the now famous “Eau de toilette” from the bergamot fruit by scooping out the pulp and squeezing the peel into sponges.

Bergamot peel is also used in aromatherapy to treat depression and as a digestive aid.

Bergamot essential oil is fragrant, uplifting and relaxing. It is no wonder bergamot was the delightful fragrance that inspired the world’s first cologne.

In Aromatherapy, bergamot has been used since antiquity to enhance mood and refresh the senses.  In short, it makes life seem better.  It’s also great for building confidence!  Jean Valnet, M.D., recommends bergamot as a natural antidepressant and to regulate appetite.

Go through our reference links now…

  1. Bergamot Essential Oil by livestrong.com
  2. Bergamot by Acne
  3. Bergamot Oil by Foods

Scrape Off The Acne – Bergamot Essential Oil

Acne can be incapacitating in terms of obliterating and completely destroying one’s ego and self-esteem and confidence….

But thankfully…oils, precisely essential oils like Bergamot, deal quite effectively with such problems…

Bergamot’s antiseptic action and ability to promote skin growth makes it perfect for treating acne. It is great for oily skin types and is effective for other skin conditions such as psoriasis and dermatitis.

Bergamot oil can be used in the treatment of –

  • Depression
  • Stress
  • Tension
  • Fear
  • Hysteria
  • Infection
  • Anorexia
  • Psoriasis
  • Eczema
  • General convalescence

Bergamot oil has a revitalizing fragrance and it blends well with other oils making it an excellent addition to any acne treatment blend. Bergamot has antibacterial and drying properties making it an ideal spot treatment for existing blemishes. The citrus aroma has a calming effect on the mind and soul. Should not be used full strength except on the advice of a licensed homeopathic professional.

Cold sores appear on your skin from a viral infection. Jeanne Rose, author of the text “375 Essential Oils and Hydrosols,” explains that bergamot oil’s properties include working as an antiviral. Although it can’t kill the virus, it can weaken it and help you body fight off the outbreak. In her book “The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils,” aromatherapist Julie Lawless recommends using bergamot oil in a skin lotion and applying it directly to the cold sore

Clinical aromatherapist Patricia Davis explains in her book “Aromatherapy: An A-Z” why she often employs bergamot oil. Davis says bergamot oil’s potent antiseptic properties help reduce the bacteria on your skin that cause acne breakouts, and the pleasant fragrance is generally welcomed by all patients. Davis uses bergamot oil for fight acne in a variety of methods including creams, lotions and steam treatments.

Boils result from a bacterial infection. Bergamot oil’s antiseptic properties can help fight off the bacteria. With boils that are small and not serious, Lawless recommends making a hot compress with bergamot oil added. Davis notes that doing this helps fight the infection and promote your skin’s healing. If the boil does not improve or worsens, Davis says it’s imperative to seek medical treatment.

Have a look at our reference links now…

  1. Bergamot by Natural Therapies
  2. Bergamot Essential Oil by e-zine
  3. Bergamot Oil by iBenefits

Send Depression On A Long Holiday – Bergamot Oil

When life and work takes a toll on us, nothing deals with it better than a nice head massage…Agree?

Well then if it is about any kind of massage, then how can essential oils stay behind…Precisely the best of them all…Bergamot essential oil…

Bergamot oil comes from the fruit peel of an orange tree, Citrus bergamia, which is native to Asia and grown in southern Italy. Do not confuse this plant with the native mints known as bergamot, also called monarda or bee balm. While bergamot oil has no proven health benefits be it –

  • Aromatherapy
  • Flavoring
  • Skin conditions
  • Bacterial and appetite problems

Consult your health care provider before using bergamot to treat any medical condition.

Bergamot oil is an essential oil that is widely used in the holistic healing art of aromatherapy. It is thought to relieve a wide variety of physical and mental complaints, ranging from anxiety and depression to bronchitis and emphysema, although most of these benefits are not backed up by medical evidence. According to author Maria Lis-Balchin in her book, “Aromatherapy Science: A Guide for Healthcare Professionals,” is also commonly used to flavor various food products, such as baked goods and Earl Grey tea.

Aroma therapists often use bergamot oil to treat anxiety and depression caused by cancer, Seasonal Affective Disorder and other illnesses. Perfumes and eau de colognes also contain this citrus oil for its fruity fragrance and soothing properties. The mechanism that causes this soothing reaction is unknown, and no studies irrefutably support their use. A review of clinical trials published in The British Journal of General Practice found aromatherapy massage with pure essential oils including bergamot has a slight anxiolytic or anti-anxiety effect. However, the research did not prove conclusively its effectiveness in treating anxiety.

Historically, Italians used bergamot oil to treat bacterial illnesses, including staphylococcus, gonococcus, meningococcus, bladder and urinary tract infections. The Complete Aromatherapy Handbook suggests using a bergamot oil rinse for mouth infections or in combination with grapefruit to treat appetite loss. However, Drugs.com advises avoiding excessive ingestion of bergamot because it may cause muscle cramping and twitching by disrupting potassium absorption.

Alright, have a look at the reference links now…

  1. Bergamot by Natural Therapies
  2. Bergamot Essential Oil by e-zine
  3. Bergamot Oil by iBenefits

 

Bitter Tablets – One. Bergamot Natural Oil – Two. Choose.

When a choice is laid in front of you, to choose between artificiality and nature…what would you pick?

Can I assume the answer being nature?

If so, then nature indeed has brought us the best it could in the form of Bergamot essential oil…

Bergamot is a citrus fruit whose rind is used for extracting the Bergamot Oil. The scientific name of Bergamot is Citrus Aurantium var. or Citrus Bergamia. It is a tropical plant but thrives well in Europe too. The chemical composition of Bergamot Oil includes Alpha Pinene, Alpha Bergaptnen, Alpha Terpineol, Limonene, Linalool, Linalyl Acetate, Nerol, Neryl Acetate, Beta Bisabolene, Geraniol, Geraniol Acetate and Myrcene.

This tree is native to South East Asia, but was introduced to Europe, and particularly Italy and is also found in the Ivory Coast, Morocco, Tunisia and Algeria.

Bergamot oil is made from a tree that can grow up to four meters high, with star-shaped flowers and smooth leaves, bearing citrus fruit resembling a cross between an orange and a grapefruit, but in a pear-shape. The fruit ripens from green to yellow.

The oil is one of the most widely used in the perfumery and toiletry industry and forms, together with neroli and lavender, the main ingredient for the classical 4711 Eau-de-cologne fragrance. It is used to flavor Earl Grey tea.

The name is derived from the city Bergamo in Lombardy, Italy, where the oil was first sold.

Many people believe there are medicinal benefits associated with bergamot oil. According to “The Aromatherapy Bible,” bergamot oil added to a bath is thought to reduce fever. Because of its purported antiseptic abilities, bergamot may be effective at treating infections. It may also aid in curing urinary tract infections. Some holistic practitioners believe bergamot can be used to treat a wide variety of digestive and respiratory diseases. According to wildcrafted.com, bergamot may be used medicinally to treat diseases such as diphtheria, bronchitis, gall stones, colic and halitosis.

The therapeutic properties of bergamot oil include –

  • Analgesic
  • Antidepressant
  • Antiseptic
  • Antibiotic
  • Anti-spasmodic
  • Stomachic
  • Calmative
  • Cicatrisant
  • Deodorant
  • Digestive
  • Febrifuge
  • Vermifuge
  • Vulnerary

How about you check out our reference links now…

  1. Bergamot Essential Oil by Drugs
  2. Bergamot Oil by Blog
  3. Bergamot Essential Oil by ehow