Expanded Description Of Bergamot Oil

Certain oils require certain bigger and better descriptions. Bergamot just being one of them.

The oil smells of fresh citrus, and is pale gold in color. People should be cautious when using this oil on the skin, because it tends to increase photosensitivity, and the skin may be damaged if it is exposed to excessive light.

Bergamot is an aromatic oil found in the peels of the fruit of the bergamot orange, a citrus tree which flourishes in Italy. The oil is used in essential oil preparations, skin care products, and as a food flavoring, most notably in Earl Gray tea. The flavor is floral and rich, with a faintly bitter or astringent flavor.

The bergamot orange, also known as Citrus bergamia, is native to Southern Asia, but was introduced to Italy, where it flourished. Attempts to cultivate it in other regions have not been nearly so successful, with Italian oranges producing the bulk of that which is commercially used. The peels of the oranges were dried and added to early flavored teas, and essence of bergamot was also extensively used in perfumes. The mild citrus scent and flavor are quite appealing to some consumers, leading to enduring demand for the orange.

As an essential oil, bergamot is believed to be uplifting and energizing. It is often included in essential oil mixtures which are designed to reduce stress, energize, and treat depression. It can be included in incense, used in an essential oil diffuser, or added to baths, in moderation. The oil is also included in skin care products, and like other citrus oils, it is faintly astringent and toning. Pure oil can be harsh on the skin, and it should always be diluted before being applied. Talking about its use, internally…

  • Bergamot is used medicinally to relieve symptoms of colds and chest or throat complaints, and for mild digestive complaints.
  • Native American Indians made an herb tea from bergamot leaves for this purpose.

Also, external use

  • The leaves are used in fruit drinks and the petals for decorating salads.
  • Bergamot leaves and petals (dried or fresh) are added to hot water for a revitalizing and perfumed bath.

Alright, have a look at our reference links now…

  1. Bergamot by Wise Geek
  2. Bergamot Essential Oil by Aroma Blog
  3. Bergamot by OF

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